Retired Faculty

David DeLeon

David DeLeon
David DeLeon

Professor De Leon taught courses on United States social and intellectual history, reform movements with special interest in comparative reform movements, and historiography.

His research has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society and the Howard University-Sponsored Faculty Research Program, and has resulted in a number of books, among them The American As Anarchist: Reflections on Indigenous Radicalism (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978), Everything is Changing: Contemporary U.S. Movements in Historical Perspective (Praeger Publishers, 1988), and Leaders from the 1960s: A Biographical Sourcebook of American Activism (Greenwood Press, 1994).

His current book project is called At the Edge: The Mainstream of Contemporary U. S. Life as Criticized by Right and Left Extremes. Professor DeLeon served as the Director of the Graduate Program for the department, and in that capacity, and as an advisor in the U. S. field, he was involved in the completion of more than thirty graduate degrees.

David DeLeon
Associate Professor of History
Ph.D., University of Iowa

Balaram Dey

Balaram Dey
Balaram Dey

Dr. Balaram Dey teaching interests included World Geography, Climate, Man & Environment, Geography of Black Diaspora, Hydrology, Remote Sensing, and Natural Conservation. His research interests included the application of remote sensing in climatology, hydrology, snow and Ice, environmental monitoring, and climate change.

Dr. Dey received research grants from: NSF, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the US Department of Education. He has sixty publications in the field of climatology, snow hydrology, environmental monitoring, agriculture, resource management, and ice dynamics. Dr. Dey taught World Geography; Climate, People & Environment; and Geography of Black Diaspora.

Balaram Dey
Professor of Geography 
M.Sc. (NBU, 1965)
M.S. (Wisconsin, 1971)
Ph.D., University of Saskatchewan

Joseph Reidy

Joseph Reidy
Joseph P. Reidy

Previously a Professor of history and an Associate Provost, Professor Reidy was Associate Dean of the Graduate School from 1998 through 2001.

Professor Reidy has taught United States history, including courses on the Civil War and Reconstruction, the U. S. South, the U.S. since the Civil War, and race, ethnicity and gender in the modern U.S. His numerous publications include the book From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, 1800-1880 (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1992).

As the Editor and Acting Co-Director of the Freedmen and Southern Society Project at the University of Maryland, College Park (1977-1984) he helped produce a series of prize-winning, edited books of documents with introductions and annotations in cooperation with a team of scholars.

Several volumes were produced over a number of years (1982-1998) and highlighted the actions of enslaved people, especially workers and soldiers, men and women, in the fight against slavery during the Civil War and after.

His other essays on the history of workers in the U. S. South have appeared in other collections and in the periodicals Agricultural History,Prologue: the Quarterly Journal of the National Archives and Records AdministrationThe Southern ReviewVirginia Magazine of Biography and History,Slavery and AbolitionSouthern Studies and Marxist Perspectives, and as chapters in other books. Professor Reidy also has served on the editorial board of the magazines Civil War History and The Filson Club Historical Quarterly.

The National Endowment for the Humanities and the Confederate Memorial Literary Society, among others, have funded Professor Reidy's work. He won the Thomas Jefferson Prize of the Society for History in the Federal Government three times, the Abraham Lincoln Prize of Gettysburg College, and the J. Franklin Jameson Outstanding Editorial Achievement Prize of the American Historical Association. His latest project is called "African American Sailors in the Civil War Navy," and it aims to identify the names of the 18,000 or so men of African ancestry who served in that war and to interpret their service.

Joseph P. Reidy 
Professor of History
Associate Provost
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University 
E-mail:jreidy@howard.edu

Jeanne M. Toungara

Jeanne M. Toungara
Jeanne M. Toungara

Jeanne Maddox Toungara taught courses on contemporary Africa, the African Diaspora and Women in Africa. Her research focuses on Côte d'Ivoire and Francophone Africa. She is the recipient of several study and research awards (Fulbright Hays, NEH, West African Research Association,etc.) and training grants, including a US Institute for Peace grant for African women in the gender studies, conflict management, and peace building, and the UNCF grant for minority sophomore students in International Public Policy.

She has lectured for the State Department Office of Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, served as a Public Member on Foreign Service promotions panels, and is a frequent visiting lecturer at the Foreign Service Institute. More recently, she served on the Democratization, Human Rights and Governance team contracted by the US Agency for International Development to prepare the 2015 five-year assessment report on Côte d'Ivoire.

As a former Assistant Provost for International Programs, she established several partnerships between Howard University and institutions in South Africa, and participated in IIE-sponsored outreach programs to Brazil. As a Fulbright Scholar Ambassador, she promotes faculty engagement abroad. She is a Salzburg Global Seminar alumna, a Mellon Foundation GlobalCitizenship Program fellow, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She earned BA, MA, and PhD degrees in African Studies and History at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Jeanne M. Toungara
Professor of History
E-mail:jtoungara@howard.edu